Jeju Island, South Korea: Food

jeju island part 2 food in the foreground and a picture of ogyeopsal in the background
Part 2 is dedicated to a topic close to my heart: Korean food. More specifically, hoeguksu (회국수) and ogyeopsal (오겹살).

jeju island part 2 food in the foreground and a picture of ogyeopsal in the background

If you visit Jeju, and you’re not vegetarian, these two should be high on your list of food to try.

Hoeguksu
Hoeguksu consists of raw fish, noodles, veggies, and spices. It’s a bit spicy, so it makes a great meal if you’re in need of re-energizing.

After exploring Seongsan Ilchulbong in the morning, I was ready for an early lunch. I was the first one to the restaurant, so my food came out quickly and ate peacefully. I was lucky because it filled up shortly after.

An empty restaurant near Seongsan Ilchulbong, Jeju, South Korea

The empty restaurant near Seongsan Ilchulbong, where I ate delicious hoeguksu.

 

The spiciness of Hoeguksu can be offset by eating it with different side dishes. Dongchimi (동치미 radish water), is my go-to for spice relief.  
Hoeguksu with side dishes. jeju, South Korea

Hoeguksu with side dishes.

Close up of hoeguksu.

Hoeguksu, all mixed up and ready to eat!

 

Ogyeopsal
If you’re familiar with Korean food, samgyeopsal probably sounds familiar. Ogyeopsal is like samgyeopsal, but instead of having three layers (sam= 삼 = 3), it has five (o = 오 = 5). 

This ogyeopsal/samgyeopsal was made from Jeju black pork, but I honestly couldn’t tell the difference between it and what I have eaten in Seoul or Busan. However, it came with grilled pineapple, something I never encountered outside of Jeju… and believe me, it was amazing. AMAZING.

If you didn’t know, eating Korean barbecue is usually a group activity. It’s a bit strange to eat it alone, but the restaurant staff was very kind and didn’t seem to judge too much. 😉

Black pork ogyeopsal being grilled on a round table, surrounded by korean side dishes and beer

This may seem like an intimidating amount of food for one person, but the taste made finishing it an easy task.

 

Mangchi: http://www.maangchi.com/recipe/dongchimi

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